OVAs originated during the early 1980s. As the VCR became a widespread fixture in Japanese homes, the Japanese anime industry grew to behemoth proportions. Demand for anime became massive, so much so that consumers would willingly go directly to video stores to buy new animation outright. While people in the United States use the phrase "direct-to-video" as a pejorative for works that could not make it onto television or movie screens, in Japan the demand was so great that direct-to-video became a necessity. Many popular and influential series such as Bubblegum Crisis (1987–1991) and Tenchi Muyo! (1992–2005) were released directly to video as OVAs.

Some OVAs based on television series (and especially those based on manga) may provide closure to the plot – closure not present in the original series. The Rurouni Kenshin OVAs, to name one series, exemplified numerous aspects of OVAs; they were slightly based on chapters of the author Nobuhiro Watsuki's manga that had not been adapted into the anime television series, had higher-quality animation, were much more violent, and were executed in a far more dark and realistic style than the TV episodes or the manga.
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I’ve seen all the video marketing stats and, yet, the numbers never cease to amaze me. I mean, I never thought video could take off how it has, but I am loving it. It is such a great tool for marketers of all sizes, especially the smaller businesses and brands. Anyway, I really love lists like these because you, as you know, you can never have too many tools to make a variety of several different types of videos.I have tried Powtoon and Renderforest and really like them. But I look forward to trying more on this list but would love to add another one here, if that’s cool. I’ve been using slide.ly/promo and they have footage that you can choose from. They have a ton of stuff including animated clips too. Thanks again for this great list.
Much OVA-production aims at an audience of male anime enthusiasts. Bandai Visual stated in a 2004 news release (for their new OVAs aimed at women) that about 50% of the customers who had bought their anime DVDs in the past fell into the category of 25- to 40-year-old men, with only 13% of purchasers women, even with all ages included.[4] These statistics cover Bandai Visual anime DVDs in general, not just OVAs, but they show the general tendency at this point[citation needed]. Nikkei Business Publications also stated in a news-release that mainly 25- to 40-year-old adults bought anime DVDs.[5] Few OVAs specifically target female audiences, but Earthian exemplifies the exceptions.
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