OVAs originated during the early 1980s. As the VCR became a widespread fixture in Japanese homes, the Japanese anime industry grew to behemoth proportions. Demand for anime became massive, so much so that consumers would willingly go directly to video stores to buy new animation outright. While people in the United States use the phrase "direct-to-video" as a pejorative for works that could not make it onto television or movie screens, in Japan the demand was so great that direct-to-video became a necessity. Many popular and influential series such as Bubblegum Crisis (1987–1991) and Tenchi Muyo! (1992–2005) were released directly to video as OVAs.

We have created over 2,250 explainer videos for over 1,300 clients in the past few years. This makes us one of the market leaders in our industry. In this ebook we pass on all our knowledge of scripting, design, animation, process and promotion. We also discuss software and types of video you can create. This is a comprehensive ebook that aims to impart years of knowledge in an easy to understand piece.
Some OVAs based on television series (and especially those based on manga) may provide closure to the plot – closure not present in the original series. The Rurouni Kenshin OVAs, to name one series, exemplified numerous aspects of OVAs; they were slightly based on chapters of the author Nobuhiro Watsuki's manga that had not been adapted into the anime television series, had higher-quality animation, were much more violent, and were executed in a far more dark and realistic style than the TV episodes or the manga.
Clicking the big plus button on web or in the iOS app will open a slide-based editor. No complicated timelines here with Spark video's intro maker! We suggest storyboarding out your video story within the app by selecting one of the preloaded story structures or creating your own by adding notes to slides, which will guide your creation. Each slide should represent just one point or thought.

Attract new customers, increase brand awareness, and create powerful content for your business. We give you all the tools you need to effortlessly create promotional videos for any type of business from showcasing products and services, to promoting a restaurant, real estate listing, online boutique, or more. Choose from a variety of easy-to-use templates to get started, then take advantage from all of sharing options to launch a video marketing campaign, embed your video onto your website, or download to your computer to use as a business presentation.
A great example of using animation for explanation is TED-Ed. If you are not signed up to their YouTube channel yet, it’s just about time. It has over 3 million subscribers and is one of the most popular educational channels on YouTube. Most videos created by the team use animation. It simplifies otherwise difficult topics like how the food you eat affects your brain or the physics of the “hardest move” in ballet.
There’s a reason why over 35,000+ users trust this tool. It’s a must have for any online marketer. Andrew Darius, the mastermind marketer behind the first, second, and third versions, has been hard at work in the lab for 2 years creating an all-new Explaindio 4.0. Since we all know the power of video in effectively relaying ANY message, I don’t need to write all about this incredible tool here.
I’ve seen all the video marketing stats and, yet, the numbers never cease to amaze me. I mean, I never thought video could take off how it has, but I am loving it. It is such a great tool for marketers of all sizes, especially the smaller businesses and brands. Anyway, I really love lists like these because you, as you know, you can never have too many tools to make a variety of several different types of videos.I have tried Powtoon and Renderforest and really like them. But I look forward to trying more on this list but would love to add another one here, if that’s cool. I’ve been using slide.ly/promo and they have footage that you can choose from. They have a ton of stuff including animated clips too. Thanks again for this great list.
As a small startup insurance agency, we have a limited budget. Philosophically, we wanted to use more of our budget to compensate our agents rather than spend time and money on marketing materials. Thankfully, Renderforest perfectly filled our need for high quality, custom video that fit nicely in our budget. We started off using a monthly plan, but quickly found that the yearly plan was a lot more cost effective.
The earliest known attempt to release an OVA involved Osamu Tezuka's The Green Cat (part of the Lion Books series) in 1983, although it cannot count as the first OVA: there is no evidence that the VHS tape became available immediately and the series remained incomplete. Therefore, the first official OVA release to be billed as such was 1983's Dallos, directed by Mamoru Oshii and released by Bandai. Other famous early OVAs, premièring shortly thereafter, were Fight! Iczer One and the original Megazone 23. Other companies were quick to pick up on the idea, and the mid-to-late 1980s saw the market flooded with OVAs. During this time, most OVA series were new, stand-alone titles.

With Explaindio Video Creator 4.0 you’ll also get access to a market. Here you get the opportunity to buy (or sell) videos. So that you can make money by selling your own video creations made with the Explaindio software or simply save time by buying attention-grabbing, higher quality videos, motions, animations or backgrounds instead of creating yourself.
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